Criminology: A Sociological Introduction by Eamonn Carrabine

By Eamonn Carrabine

This sociological advent presents a much-needed textbook for an more and more well known region of analysis. Written through a crew of authors with a vast diversity of training and person services, it covers virtually each module provided in united kingdom criminological classes and may be important to scholars of criminology around the globe. It covers: key traditions in criminology, their severe review and more moderen advancements new methods of brooding about crime and keep an eye on, together with crime and feelings, medicines and alcohol, from a public health and wellbeing viewpoint assorted dimensions of the matter of crime and misconduct, together with crime and sexuality, crimes opposed to the surroundings, crime and human rights and organizational deviance key debates in criminological idea the legal justice process new components corresponding to the globalization of crime, and crime in our on-line world. in particular designed to be undemanding, every one bankruptcy comprises boxed fabric on present controversies, key thinkers and examples of crime and felony justice around the globe with statistical tables, maps, summaries, serious pondering questions, annotated references and a thesaurus of keyword phrases, in addition to additional examining sections and extra source details as weblinks.

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For instance, if we take Christianity, it is clear that this system of thought did not separate out the lawbreaker as different or abnormal, but rather understood his or her behaviour as a manifestation of universal human depravity and the sinful state of all humankind. This is clearly a very different way of thinking about crime from that espoused by criminology. Nevertheless, traditional accounts of crime, whether these be Christian or otherwise, are not entirely remote from present thinking about the subject.

In recent years, though, criminologists too have become more reflective about research issues affecting their own subject relative to others, resulting in a number of specialist texts (Jupp, 1989; Maxfield and Babbie, 1995; Sapsford, 1996; Jupp et al. 2000; King and Wincup, 2000; Champion, 2000). A question that students, teachers and researchers in criminology often grapple with is whether there is anything distinctive about criminological research compared with research in other disciplines in the human and social sciences.

Hate crime is discussed further in Chapter 10. ■ GETTING INSIDE THE IMMEDIACY OF CRIME While the limitations of official crime statistics frustrate criminologists, the potential of researching criminal activity first-hand has excited the criminological imagination. In a much-quoted phrase, Robert E. Park, chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago in the 1920s, exhorted research students to ‘go get the seat of your pants dirty in real research’ – in short, to go and get acquainted first-hand with the social world around them.

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