Criminal and Social Justice by Professor Dee Cook

By Professor Dee Cook

Felony and Social Justice presents an incredible perception into the connection among social inequality, crime, and criminalization. during this obtainable and leading edge account, Dee cook dinner examines the character of the connection among felony and social justice - either in concept and in perform. present social, financial, political, and cultural concerns are delivered to endure, and modern examples are used all through to assist the scholar to contemplate this courting.

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Firstly, the ‘16 hour rule’, and secondly, the concept of availability for work (a ‘work test’). 1 But if they work less than 16 hours, they are considered part of the benefit system and are subject to its disciplinary regulations, and this includes the requirement to be demonstrably seeking paid employment (unless claimants are lone parents of small children, or exempted from seeking work through sickness or disability). Welfare claimants may work part time (for less than 16 hours) to supplement their benefits.

The men in the family were unable to hold a job for more than a few weeks at a time. Drunkenness was common. The children grew up ill-schooled and ill-behaved and contributed a disproportionate share of the local juvenile delinquents. (1990:1) For Murray the problem of poverty was not lack of (or low) income and the ‘deserving’ poor were therefore those whose behaviour remained respectable in the face of their adversity: the working poor, the elderly, the sick and children. By contrast, the ‘undeserving’ poor – primarily the ‘able-bodied’ who did not work – languished in a culture of dependency.

But, at the same time, in the absence of criminal justice, social justice will be an impossible goal. (1996:336) Conversely, Hudson (1987) focuses instead on social justice and recognises ‘the impossibility of just legal punishments in an unjust society’. Nonetheless, she argues, ‘we should scale down the level of our infliction of punishment rather than our search for justice’ and strive for social justice whilst immediately concentrating on doing ‘less harm’ through the criminal justice and penal systems (Hudson, 1987:184).

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