Computer Methods for Solving Dynamic Separation Problems by Charles Donald Holland

By Charles Donald Holland

Booklet of computational equipment

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3-15) and (3-17) correspond to a situation in which conditions are far more severe than any which ever existed during the test runs. The boundary conditions (see Eq. (3-12)) suppose that the initial temperature of the metal at the time of the upset is equal to the temperature TA of the surroundings. To obtain some idea of the difference in the mean temperatures of the wall given by the solution of the boundary-value problem (see Eq. (3-15)) and the heat transfer model (Eq. (3-17)), consider the case where TA= 80°F and T, = 250°F.

3-3. The following solution to this problem may be deduced from the result given by Carslaw and Jaeger(5) in case IV on page 126. 0 Y,(x) = B, C,(B, cos D l . , Bn = first n positive roots of (P2 - HI H Z ) sin Dl - B(H, + H z ) cos pl = 0 An outline of the method of solution is given in Probs. 3-4 and 3-5. The result given by Eq. (3-13) may be used to determine the mean temperature which is required to give the correct heat content of a finite section of the slab at any time t > 0. The following expression for the determination of this mean temperature Tm(t)is formulated in a manner similar to that shown for Eq.

Burdett and C . D. , vol. 17, p. 1080 (1971). ) Effect I ...................... 08 pounds of supply steam per pound of gross product (Ref. 25). The plant consisted of 17 effects of the long-tube vertical (LTV) type of evaporator. The falling-film version of the LTV evaporator was used. As shown in Figs. 3-2, 3-3, and 3-4, a portion of the energy possessed by the condensate leaving each effect was recovered by allowing the condensate to flash in each of the condensate flash-tanks. The first twelve effects of the plant were built as separate units, and each effect was sized according to its particular requirements.

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