Community Media: International Perspectives by Linda K. Fuller

By Linda K. Fuller

Drawing on either theoretical and useful case experiences, group Media strikes from constructing makes an attempt at neighborhood media to case experiences and directly to cyber-examples. Alphabetically, its greater than dozen situations contain reviews at the Asian Pacific area, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Ghana, India, eire, Israel, Japan, Latin the USA, Lebanon, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, Turkey, the uk, the USA, in addition to a few different views and (virtual) visions. The members, all unusual overseas communications students, current a number views at the ever-burgeoning zone of grassroots, neighborhood media via the folk, for the folk, their learn representing player statement, hands-on neighborhood involvement, serving on foreign forums of administrators, content material research, and moral inquiries. it is going to entice a variety of educational disciplines, group media teams, and the millions of people that paintings of their neighborhood cable tv facilities to supply an alternate voice to mainstream media.

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In the discipline of media studies “user-led” describes the participation of nonprofessionals in the creation of media. User-led media can produce (or originate from) communities of like-minded creators, such as fan groups, hobbyists, collectors, or techies. This activity, increasing in frequency across different sites, represents a shift in the nature of cultural engagement and in economics of cultural production (Lessig, 2001; Leadbeater, 2003; Hartley, 2004). Community media has a greater role to play in this landscape, than it did in the broadcast era, when we are witnessing activities that circumvent or redirect traditional media structures—helping change relations between audiences and the creators of media, bringing diversity of voices and interests into the public sphere.

Higgins, J. W. (1999). Community television and the vision of media literacy, social action, and empowerment. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. Vol. 43, no. 4:624–644. 16 Linda K. Fuller Hochmeimer, J. L. (1992). Organizing democratic radio: Problems and practice. Paper presented at IAMCR, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Hoffer, A. (2000). Digital guerrilla video: A grassroots guide to the revolution. San Francisco, CA: Miller Freeman Books. Holland, E. and J. S. Stappers. (1992). Community media and community communication, in The people’s voice: Local radio and television in Europe.

Television was an immediate success in Australia. In order to maintain cultural policy objectives, the government adopted a method of quid pro quo, whereby broadcasters were required to conform to policy objectives (such as local content quotas and children’s programs) in return for a stable market in which no more than three commercial broadcasters were allowed to operate in any one area. By the early 1970s, television had evolved into a mature and relatively stable industry, but community television became a permanent fixture in the analogue landscape only in 2004.

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