Chairs - A History by Florence de Dampierre

By Florence de Dampierre

Книга о стульях - развитии, видах и т.д.

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S. senate and 2 0 congressmen: 8 from South Carolina, 4 from North Carolina, 3 from Alabama, and one each from the other former Confederate states (Zinn, 1 9 8 0 , p. 1 9 5 ) . Moreover, the 14th Amendment (ratified in 1 8 6 8 ) declared that "all persons born or naturalized in the United States" were citizens and that no state shall make or enforce any law that shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Because many young African American males wore suits with padded shoulders and trousers that were tapered at the Hustler 49 ankles, the term zoot suit passed into everyday usage (Cosgrove, 1 9 8 4 , p. 4 0 ) . Moreover, the zoot suit became the display of those negotiating a specific masculine, race, and class identity. As Cosgrove (p. " Furthermore, zoot-suiters challenged, at the symbolic level, essentialist notions of gender, race, and class. In fact, they represented what Dick Hebdige ( 1 9 7 8 , p.

Each child was placed in a foster home, and at age 13 Malcolm came under the custodial control of a white couple, the Swerlins, of Mason, Michigan. This was Malcolm's first close relationship with white people; in retrospect, he notes that "they were good peo• ple" (Malcolm X , 1 9 6 4 , p. 2 6 ) . Although the Swerlins also "liked" Malcolm, they refused to consider him a human being. Rather, they looked on him as a "mascot," a family pet. As Malcolm (p. 2 6 ) put it: They all liked my attitude, and it was out of their liking for me that I soon became accepted by them—as a mascot.

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