Celtic Mythology by John Arnott MacCulloch

By John Arnott MacCulloch

This vintage learn of the traditional stories of eire and Wales will delight everyone interested in Celtic folklore. Its energetic stories of romance and love, of struggle and carnage, and of deeds either noble and base are followed via professional remark, which locations them inside of a bigger cultural context.

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Celtic Mythology A to Z

Mythology is a key that is helping us unencumber the mysteries of individuals, cultures, and
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symbolize the sunlight, the celebrities, hearth, water, air, earth, animals, and the spirit world
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Celtic myths, legends, and folktales are splendidly diversified. In them, readers
will locate experience, romance, humor, and tragedy. however the tales additionally explore
enduring themes—questions that each society needs to ask itself approximately love, friendship,
loyalty, hatred, jealousy, and betrayal. via their tales, the Celts
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Their tale starts off round 800 b. c.

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With the fall of an Indra, one hair drops out. That is why in the center all the hairs are gone. When the rest of the period allotted to the present Brahma will have expired, I myself shall die. 0 Brahmin Boy, it follows I am short of days. Why there­ fore a house, a wife, or a son? "When every blink of the eyes ofVigm marks the passing of a Brahma, it necessarily follows that everything is as insubstantial as a cloud taking shape and dissolving. U. U is more than redemption, since every joy, even heavenly bliss, is fragile as a dream and only interferes with concentration on the Supreme.

The chosen center may be anywhere. The Holy Land is no special place. It is every place that has ever been recognized and mythologized by any people as home. Moreover, this understanding of the ubiquity of the metaphysical cen­ ter perfectly matches the lesson of the galaxies and of the Michelson-Morley finding that was epitomized in Einstein's representation of the utter impos­ sibility of establishing absolute rest. It is the essence of relativity. And, when translated from the heavens to this earth, it implies that moral judgments depend likewise upon the relation of the frame of reference to the person or act being measured.

We are, in fact, productions of this earth. We are, as it were, its organs. Our eyes are the eyes of this earth; our knowl­ edge is the earth's knowledge. And the earth, as we now know, is a pro­ duction of space. Alerted by such remotely intimate thoughts, and deciding to learn something more (a posteriori) about the anatomy of our great-grandmother, Space, I turned for information to that remarkable world atlas (actually, an atlas of the universe) , which had been issued as the fifth edition (1981) of the National Geographic Atlas ofthe World.

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