Captive Images Race, Crime, Photography by Katherine Biber

By Katherine Biber

Captive pictures examines the law’s therapy of photographic proof and makes use of it to enquire the connection among legislations, photo and myth. established round the scholarly exam of a financial institution theft, within which a surveillance digicam captures the theft in growth, Katherine Biber attracts upon serious writing from psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, artwork, legislations, literature and feminism to 'read' this crime, its texts and its photos. the result's an interdisciplinary research of crime that unfolds a compelling narrative approximately race family members, nationwide id and worry. This ebook is a vital learn for all degrees of legislations scholars learning, or attracted to, legislation, criminology and cultural experiences.

Show description

Read or Download Captive Images Race, Crime, Photography PDF

Best criminology books

Crime War Global Trafficking

Globalization creates profitable possibilities for traffickers of gear, soiled funds, blood diamonds, guns, and different contraband. potent countermeasures require overseas collaboration, yet what if a few international locations undergo whereas others make the most of illicit exchange? purely overseas associations with robust compliance mechanisms can make sure that profiteers won't circumvent their legislation enforcement obligations.

Celebrity Culture and Crime: The Joy of Transgression (Cultural Criminology)

Within the twenty first century celebrities and megastar tradition prospers. This book explores the much famous yet little analyzed dating among big name and crime. Criminals who turn into celebrities and celebrities who turn into criminals are tested, drawing on Foucault's thought of governance.

Peterhead: The Inside Story of Scotland's Toughest Prison

Robert Jeffrey, writer of the bestselling "Barlinnie tale" and different actual crime books, now tells the notable tale of the notorious Peterhead legal in Scotland's some distance north-east. inbuilt the Eighties as a part of an bold humanitarian plan to exploit convict labour to build a 'harbour of safe haven' at the town's wild, storm-battered coast, it grew to become what a few name Scotland's gulag.

Additional resources for Captive Images Race, Crime, Photography

Sample text

In Zˇizˇek’s Lacanian theory, the Thing is that which we most ardently desire, something we believe will make us whole. All of our endeavour is in pursuit of what we have lost: our Thing. Hage wrote: ‘If the fantasy space [the nation] is to be perceived as possible, it requires something to explain its failure to come about’ (1998: 74). We believe that our Thing has been taken from us by the Other; the Other is the obstacle to our completion, the impediment to the fulfilment of our fantasy. They have our Thing; if only we can eliminate the Other, we can get our Thing back.

The Aborigine is the overwhelmed Other. Simultaneously conquered, dispossessed, enclosed and erased, the Aborigine is the ‘being’ and the ‘nothing’ of Australian identity (McLean, 1999: 114). As obstacle to, and agent of, legitimacy, Aboriginality is the impossible kernel at the heart of the nation. This is Zˇizˇek’s paradox, in which the Thing is simultaneously threatened by, and inaccessible to, the Other (1992c: 165). The Thing itself, when stripped of its fantasy components, is an empty space.

Further, he argued that photography became the tool – the weapon – of the bourgeoisie in entrenching a system that aspired to liberate one class through the sublimation of another: [P]hotography also needs to be understood as a simultaneous threat and promise in relation to the prevailing cultural ambitions of a triumphant but wary western bourgeoisie of the mid-nineteenth century. The 16 Captive Images: Race, Crime, Photography historical context was one of crisis and paradox; to forget this is to risk achieving an overly harmonized understanding of the contradictory material and symbolic forces at work in the development of bourgeois culture.

Download PDF sample

Rated 5.00 of 5 – based on 44 votes