British Technology and European Industrialization: The by Kristine Bruland

By Kristine Bruland

How did small ecu economies gather the applied sciences and talents had to industrialize within the 19th century? during this very important contribution to a long-standing debate, Kristine Bruland seems to be on the Norwegian event to teach how a technological infrastructure used to be created, and means that a lot of this was once as a result of efforts of British computer makers who from the mid 1840s vigorously sought overseas markets. delivering not just simple technical prone but in addition expert labour to establish after which supervise the operation of the hot equipment, British fabric engineering organisations have been capable of offer an entire 'package' of companies, considerably easing the preliminary technical difficulties confronted via Norwegian marketers. Kristine Bruland's case-study of the Norwegian fabric demonstrates sincerely the ambiguity that Britain's entrepreneurial efforts within the offer of capital items out of the country have been principally answerable for the production of the technical commercial bases of a lot of her significant international rivals.

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Ltd of Oldham, machine makers to Lancashire and the world', Business History, 23 (1981); Kirk, Textile Machinery Industry, G. Wright, 'New evidence on the stubborn English mule and the cotton industry, 1878—1920', Economic History Review, 2nd Series, 37, 4, pp. 507-19. 34 Britain and Norway, 1800—1845: two transitions capital goods industry form, in effect, process innovations for the end-using industry. As Rosenberg has argued, this institutionalizes technological development and change as the province of a particular industry.

142. D . Farnie, 'Platt Bros, and Co. Ltd of Oldham, machine makers to Lancashire and the world', Business History, 23 (1981); Kirk, Textile Machinery Industry, G. Wright, 'New evidence on the stubborn English mule and the cotton industry, 1878—1920', Economic History Review, 2nd Series, 37, 4, pp. 507-19. 34 Britain and Norway, 1800—1845: two transitions capital goods industry form, in effect, process innovations for the end-using industry. As Rosenberg has argued, this institutionalizes technological development and change as the province of a particular industry.

After a hesitant period at the beginning of the century, the industry grew strongly from 1830, both in vessels and tonnage; the latter grew at compound rates of about 5-6 percent per year,15 and by 1880 Norway possessed the third largest mercantile marine in the world. This growth appears to have been based on the conjunction of particularly favourable supply factors, especially the ready availability of large numbers of competent seamen and skippers, with the expanding demand resulting from the sharp growth in world trade from mid century.

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