Blurred Borders: Transnational Migration between the by Jorge Duany

By Jorge Duany

During this entire comparative research, Jorge Duany explores how migrants to the USA from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico keep a number of ties to their international locations of foundation.

Chronicling those diasporas from the tip of worldwide conflict II to the current, Duany argues that every sending country's dating to the U.S. shapes the transnational adventure for every migrant workforce, from felony prestige and migratory styles to paintings actions and the connections migrants hold with their domestic nations. mixing large ethnographic, archival, and survey learn, Duany proposes that modern migration demanding situations the conventional proposal of the countryside. expanding numbers of immigrants and their descendants lead what Duany calls "bifocal" lives, bridging or extra states, markets, languages, and cultures all through their lives. while countries try and draw their barriers extra in actual fact, the ceaseless flow of transnational migrants, Duany argues, calls for the rethinking of traditional equations among birthplace and place of abode, id and citizenship, borders and boundaries.

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Additional resources for Blurred Borders: Transnational Migration between the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States

Sample text

Citizen since 1985. My diasporic condition has undoubtedly shaped my research on migration from the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. In 1983 I began to study Cuban exiles in San Juan for my doctoral dissertation. In 1987 my first postdoctoral research project focused on Dominican migration to Puerto Rico. In 1993 I conducted a field study of Dominican transnationalism in New York City. Over the past decade and a half, most of my intellectual efforts have dwelt on the Puerto Rican diaspora in the United States.

Someone once asked when I first “became” bilingual. I responded that my parents sent me to an all-English missionary school in the Panama Canal Zone during my third grade. Initially, I could not understand most of what was taught, except for Spanish class. But that year forced me to learn English quickly to survive academically. S. military personnel stationed in Panama. ” Anti-Americanism was entrenched in Panama City during my childhood years. After moving to Puerto Rico, I was again placed in an all-English seventhgrade group called “Continental”— referring to the children of American businesspeople on the island— because I did well in the English entrance exam.

S. citizenship, such as voting for the president and vice president. They also assume new legal and economic obligations, such as paying federal income taxes. Moreover, they cross significant geographic, linguistic, cultural, and even racial borders when they migrate. Regardless of their political ideology, most Puerto Ricans on the island and in the diaspora see themselves as part of a distinctive Puerto Rican nation (see de la Garza et al. 1992; Morris 1995; and Rivera Ortiz 1996). Even on the mainland, few Puerto Ricans identify themselves primarily as American, Latino, Hispanic, or even Caribbean.

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