Biodiversity of Western Rhodopes (Bulgaria And Greece): by Petar Beron

By Petar Beron

The current quantity of the sequence "Biodiversity of Bulgaria", treating the Western Rhodope Mountains, comprises forty papers through seventy one authors. It begins with a geographical define. It contains common experiences of the Mycota (1,763 species of fungi), mosses (364 species) and algae (1,257 species, forms and kinds) of the whole Rhodopes. One paper every one matters the better plants and the arboreal variety of the Western Rhodopes. many of the contributions (34) deal with animal variety, altogether contemplating 3,958 species of Rhizopoda, Nematoda, Oligochaeta, Acanthocephala, Cladocera, Calanoida, Copepoda, Syncarida, Amphipoda, Ephemeroptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Trichoptera, Diptera, Mollusca, Pisces, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, Insectivora, Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Macromammalia. for every of those better taxa, areas and teams very important for conservation, in addition to endemics, relicts, secure and endangered species are defined. The ebook is addressed to botanists and zoologists, conservationists, biogeographers, and all fans of the Balkan's nature.

Show description

Read or Download Biodiversity of Western Rhodopes (Bulgaria And Greece): Biodiversity of Bulgaria (Faunistica) PDF

Best biophysics books

Vibrational Spectroscopy in Life Science

The authors describe simple theoretical strategies of vibrational spectroscopy, tackle instrumental elements and experimental systems, and talk about experimental and theoretical equipment for examining vibrational spectra. it's proven how vibrational spectroscopy offers details on basic points of proteins, equivalent to constitution, dynamics, and protein folding.

The Biosocial Nature of Man (Evergreen books)

Has proprietor identify crossed out on first clean web page, has underlining inside of booklet, fresh, little or no put on

Extra info for Biodiversity of Western Rhodopes (Bulgaria And Greece): Biodiversity of Bulgaria (Faunistica)

Sample text

The Earth surface reflecting capacity (albedo) determines the conditions at which the Earth surface absorbs a part of the solar radiation. The absorbed summary radiation causes land heating, as well as heating of the adjacent atmosphere. That is why it has a decisive role for the radiation and thermal balance. ). Significant albedo differences can be observed only in winter, when it is possible to form snow cover. 20 in the Thracian basin, according to VELEV, 1990). Taking into account the summary radiation data and albedo values it is easy to see, that the land-absorbed summary solar radiation, which is the heat balance incoming part of the radiation balance, fluctuates between 4000 and 4800 MJ/m2 annually.

The soil profile (deep, mostly about 60-80 cm) is not complete, with more skeletal constitution, while the organic substance producing horizons (Aturf and A) lie immediately upon rocky rubble (eluvium) or upon proluvium. Depending on the organic matter accumulation, as well as the substance properties, three soil subtypes can be outlined: common or swarded (halpic) soils with well formed sward, from 8 to 15 cm thick; peaty (histic) soils with humus contents between 20 and 30%; black soil (chernozem-like) - looking soils (molic), developed upon carbonate rocks (Mursalitsa).

Such cases can be observed throughout the whole year, but most often in May and June, when the cold air mass is unstable, with a high vertical temperature gradient and powerful convective motions, while air temperature differences before and after the cold front are great. Front passages invoke temperature reductions by 5 to 10°C and formation of cumulus rain clouds, producing significant precipitation. Often these synoptic conditions cause spring-summer precipitation maximums. Mountain slopes create conditions for additional convection in the cold air mass after the front and precipitation quantities increase along their medium-height- and lower parts, especially along slopes of Northern and Northwest exposure.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.53 of 5 – based on 32 votes