Advances in Insect Physiology, Vol. 11 by J. E. Treherne, M. J. Berridge, V. B. Wigglesworth

By J. E. Treherne, M. J. Berridge, V. B. Wigglesworth

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Rep'na. It seems that parabiosis experiments of the kind performed by Green (1964b) in his investigation into the effect of feeding on locomotor activity in P. regina might usefully be repeated, this time t o determine whether the feeding of one fly influences the tarsal threshold of its parabiotic partner. The possibility that perseverating effects generated in the CNS by inputs from internal sources might play a role in the regulation of tarsal threshold has not been directly investigated in P.

Therefore, on the basis of the evidence discussed so far, the possibility cannot be completely eliminated that input concerning fore-gut distension is effective in causing threshold elevation only if the CNS is receiving input from other monitoring systems indicating that the fly is in a fed state. There have been a number of direct investigations into the possibility that changes with feeding and deprivation other than those occurring in the gut might also play a part in the regulation of threshold.

Several characteristics of the time course of changes in threshold after feeding in normal flies, and in flies which received various treatments involving ligation of some part of the gut, suggest that the tarsal threshold at any given time might not be dependent simply upon the current level of sensory input reaching the CNS at that time. The first of these is that, as previously mentioned, peak threshold is not reached for some time after feeding (Evans and Dethier, 1957; Evans and Barton Browne, 1960), and the second that the thresholds of insects whose crop ducts were ligated either before or immediately after feeding remain elevated for 4 or more hours, even though the insects, respectively, have no capacity t o store solution or are unable t o release stored material into the fore-gut after feeding.

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